Moto E20 Phone
Tech & Gadgets

Moto E20 Phone

The Moto E 2020 has a sleek design with narrow bezels (save for a minor chonk at the bottom) and a teardrop notch. It looks a lot like recent Nokia phones, and it’s a departure from last year’s model.

A headphone jack and microphone are located on the top of the device. The SIM tray is on the left, and the volume and power controls are on the right. The lone down-firing speaker, another microphone, and an outdated Micro USB port are all found on the bottom. I get that this is a $150 phone, but Micro USB is no longer an advantage or a realistic feature in even a budget phone in 2020. It’s also worth mentioning that the sound from the single speaker is mono; there’s no stereo sound via the headphones.

Moto E20 Phone

The phone has a glossy plastic back and a plastic midframe, as well as a rear-facing capacitive fingerprint sensor that worked well in my testing. However, after using it for the past week, I feel compelled to point you that this is the most slick phone I’ve ever used. I’m not the kind to drop phones, but something about the form, feel, size, and weight of this one causes it to fly out of my pocket or hands at each given opportunity. When I say I must have dropped this phone at least once a day, I am not exaggerating. I strongly advise you to get a case for it.

Surprisingly, the display quality is acceptable. It isn’t the brightest outdoor screen — in fact, it is a little too dim — but it is large and colourful. The 720p resolution isn’t particularly sharp at this size, but you’ll get used to it after a time. The screen illumination is also uniform.

Apart from outside use, my only significant issue with the screen was the default brightness, which seemed to be badly calibrated even after a week of instruction and fine-tuning. In low light, no matter what I did, it was always a little too dark or bright, and I had to manually adjust it.

Moto E20 Phone

Performance, software, and battery life are all factors to consider.

The performance of the 2020 Moto E had me a little taken aback. Don’t get me wrong: the Snapdragon 632 isn’t a flagship — it’s a 2018 SoC, and I’m about to go into a long list of flaws and concerns just below. Even with the older chipset, it was surprisingly good for normal, non-gaming use, which is a lot better than I expected for $150. In day-to-day use, I have some “flagship” phones from 2017 that don’t feel as speedy as the 2020 Moto E, and it’s amazing how fantastic cheap phones have gotten. I’d miss flagship performance if I had to live with this phone for a year, but I’d probably be fine.